Dr. Saad Saad Discusses how to deal with Concussions

Schools have opened all over the country, and sports are one of the things that students do both at school and home. Most parents are concerned about youth sports, but Dr. Saad Saad is ready to share some of his views concerning the games and the treatments necessary in case a student falls sick in school.

Dr. Saad Saad is a well-known pediatric surgeon in the United States of America. The guidelines will cover children with concussions and its treatment, offering doctors, coaches, and parents with the required tools that they require to ensure the best results for their children with placid traumatic brain injury.

Over 800,000 kids seek medical attention for traumatic brain injury each year. According to research some of these brain injuries are caused by the repeated blows that the kids receive while playing games such as football when receiving the ball with the head.

Some of these blows have led to dementia, long-term memory loss as well as other severe health issues.

A concussion is a medical condition that is caused by a jolt, a blow or bump to the head that leads to traumatic brain injury. Besides, the damage can be brought about by a hit on any part of the body that will make the brain and the head to race forth and back. Learn more about Dr. Saad Saad: https://doctor.webmd.com/doctor/saad-saad-md-3d5f8ce5-a764-4c86-b201-e50ec51cd7f2-overview

The sudden movement can cause the brain to bounce around or make the skull to twist. When such happens, the brain experiences chemical changes that can stretch it as well as damage the brain cells.

According to Dr. Saad, concussions are very dangerous. Although most doctors describe it as a mild brain injury because it does not threaten life, it has more serious effects on an individual.

In rare cases, there may be a collection of blood which is very dangerous to form on the brain after the blow, jolt, or bump. When it happens, it is necessary to rush the individual to the emergency room immediately. Read more: When a Child Swallows a Foreign Object – Advice by Dr. Saad Saad and Life Lessons from Dr. Saad Saad, Pediatric Surgeon

Some signs of concussions include one pupil looking big that the other as well as unable to wake up or drowsiness. In addition to this, the individual will experience headaches that always get worse and very persistent. Slurred speech, numbness, weakness, or decreased coordination are also some of the dangerous signs of the condition.

Moreover, the individual may experience nausea or repeated vomiting, seizures or convulsions. Restlessness, unusual behavior, agitation or increased confusion could also indicate signs of a concussion.

It is the determination and dedication that Dr. Saad Saad has put in his work that he is today one of the accomplished pediatric surgeons. He has managed to change his life from humble beginning in Palestine to now that he is one of the senior medical practitioners in the United States.

Dr. Eric Forsthoefel Advocates for More Access to Primary Care

Dr. Eric Forsthoefel has worked as a prominent emergency room physician and has spoken openly about the toll that limited access to primary care is taking on the resources of hospital emergency rooms across the U.S. He is shedding light on an important trend in the health care industry of patients who do not have adequate access to primary care options or medical insurance coverage seeing emergency rooms as the only viable option for receiving medical care. This means that uninsured patients are visiting emergency rooms even when they are not suffering from a true medical emergency. Dr. Eric Forsthoefel hit the nail on the head by explaining that emergency room staff never turn patients away, but they are being hit with an overwhelming challenge of serving an increasing number of patients without a commensurate increase in resources.

Recent data shows that more than one-third of the patients who visit the emergency room do not actually require immediate medical attention. Rather than brushing this trend off as an indication that patients are over-exaggerating their injuries, a closer look at the data reveals that patients on Medicaid are most likely to fall into the category of frequent fliers at emergency rooms across the country. Dr. Eric Forsthoefel notes that many primary care providers in certain areas do not accept patients on Medicaid, which leaves those patients with few places to turn in times of injury. Another reason why emergency rooms have become the popular choice for those on Medicaid is because they are likely not subjected to a co-pay for any specialty services they might receive while there. Medical bills are one of the primary reasons that many Americans file for bankruptcy.

One of the ways that Dr. Eric Forsthoefel sees the system reaching a more balanced dynamic is by increasing the number of non-urgent care facilities available in all communities. This includes facilities that are open outside of normal business hours when a primary care physician might be unavailable to see patients. Insurance providers will have to accommodate these types of facilities in making co-payments affordable for their insured in order for this model to be effective. Alternatively, Dr. Eric Forsthoefel suggests that primary care physicians should consider providing more evening hours for patients so that they can receive the medical attention they need in a timely manner. Otherwise, patients will feel that the only way they can get responsive care is by being admitted to an emergency room. The same is true for weekend schedules at primary care facilities. This trend has taken hold for some pediatric facilities, but many adult patients are still left without options on how to receive non-urgent medical care outside of regular business hours.

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